by Clara Lind ('20), pictured at far right during a class discussion

While we spent a lot of time watching movies, we also spent time talking and thinking—particularly about what it means to be a hero. Using the movies we watched as an avenue for this, we discussed who the heroes were in each of the movies based on their role and actions.

Interestingly, the heroes usually weren’t who we expected. This led to discussions about heroes in faith and in real life. For me, this was a new lens to watch movies through, and the discussions that came out of it were relevant to me.

Another daily activity was baking bread together. The kitchen was a little crowded and hectic, but it became a routine that was a lot of fun. We learned skills, such as how to properly knead dough, and all participated in an experience that was difficult because it required a lot of patience.

I particularly enjoyed getting to know people whom I don't often spend time with. Our activities—such as baking bread, shopping together for groceries, and making short films—provided fun ways to interact and get to know people in a very different setting than we are usually in at school.

    

Read reflections by Naomi Torres and other students from the Civil Rights Interterm.